Come Experience Shakuhachi, Japan’s bamboo flute of Zen

20th Anniversary Shakuhachi Summer Camp of the Rockies June 21-25

Come join all levels of shakuhachi performers, professionals, and enthusiasts this summer in the breathtaking Rocky Mountains. From the beginnings of the World Shakuhachi Festival 1998 in Boulder, the biggest event in the modern history of the shakuhachi, presenting its 20th camp this year: the Shakuhachi Summer Camp of the Rockies.

Sunrise Ranch
100 Sunrise Ranch Road, Loveland, Colorado 80538, United States
https://www.shakucamp.com

shakuhachi 2

Shakuhachi Camp of the Rockies is the longest running international shakuhachi intensive in the world. Likewise, the combined performing and teaching experience of the faculty is unparalleled:

Yôdô Kurahashi II  ̶  Kyoto, Japan
Kaoru Kakizakai  ̶  Tokyo, Japan
Riley Lee  ̶  Sydney, Australia
Christopher Yohmei Blasdel  ̶  Honolulu, HI
David Kansuke Wheeler  ̶  Boulder, CO

Yoko Hiraoka  ̶  Louisville, CO

Scholarships are available and Beginners Welcome!  Beginner students will be provided with their own core curriculum, and all levels, from absolute beginner (even if you’ve never before picked up a shakuhachi!) to advanced, will have the opportunity to study a select number of pieces with a thoroughness and depth not possible in other festivals or workshops. Rockies Camp has an emphasis on total immersion in playing, learning and experiencing the profound world of the shakuhachi, with Honkyoku (solo Zen music), Sankyoku (ensemble pieces), Folk, Modern Improvisation and more.  There are also special concerts by the faculty and students and other engaging programs every night during Camp.

Bi-lingual:  All lectures and classes will be conducted bilingually in English and Japanese. At the bottom of this post you will find a Hogaku Journal Article in Japanese.

The Community:
Becoming part of and engaging with a community of shakuhachi kindred spirits benefits even players of as introspective a musical instrument as the shakuhachi. Seeing the ‘painful’ struggle of others can be both reassuring and motivating. The Rockies Camp community continues to provide support, friendship, and opportunities to play together throughout the year to those who want a break from the solitude experienced by most shakuhachi enthusiasts.

Previous Campers want to share the special experiences and community of shared study, practice and living that this camp creates with new participants from all around the world in a relaxed yet dedicated environment. Participation at this camp will directly enhance any shakuhachi player or musician’s life with the opportunity to study with some of the world’s finest masters of the shakuhachi, listed above.

Events include a Student Concert and Duet Night—and attending lectures and workshops regarding all aspects of shakuhachi theory, history and practice. You are welcome to join in a variety of extracurricular activities, including Sunrise Ro-buki, Morning Yoga and Meditation and evening socializing, in a full-time celebration of this instrument, its music and its community.

Take a look at this quick camp introduction by faculty member, David Wheeler:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1kM2ly73Uw

Highlights and the camp experience:

All students may observe any breakout class they like. However, they may not participate unless capable at the class level (e.g. an advanced class instructor will not make time for additional explanation or instruction for beginners who choose to attend).

As a special 20th Shakuhachi Camp event, each faculty member will perform one piece and tell the story behind its significance, including personal, musical and/or historical contexts. Sunrise Ro-buki is a wonderful way to start the camp day with the long tone blowing of RO (ロ) to greet the rising sun at Moon Rock above Sunrise. All students and faculty gather to play multi-part arrangements of pieces, mostly not traditional Japanese, but also including some Honkyoku duets, etc. All students are encouraged to participate in the student concert, playing the piece of their choice, either solo or ensemble (which includes some group pieces for absolute beginners and beginners). After-hours get to know the faculty better and meet your new camper friends at the social hosted by faculty.

Concerts

·  Masters of the Shakuhachi in Boulder Pre-camp Concert in Boulder on June 20 at 7PM (venue TBA). An enchanting evening of music of the Japanese Bamboo Flute, presented by internationally acclaimed artists. This public concert is a special celebration of these artists’ gathering in Colorado for the Shakuhachi Summer Camp of the Rockies showcasing pieces especially for this occasion.
·  Masters of the Shakuhachi at Sunrise Ranch Saturday, June 23 at 7:30 PM. This showcase recital features the full faculty of the Shakuhachi Summer Camp of the Rockies performing a concert of solo and ensemble works, both modern and classical in the Dome at Sunrise Ranch.

Registration Fees:

  • Early-bird Registration Rates are good until April 30, 2018 for Flute Society members: $400
  • Regular Registration Fee: $450

Special Tuition for Absolute Beginners (new to the shakuhachi) attending Camp for the First Time: $200

  • Registration Fee after March 31, 2018: $250· Scholarships: for the first time since its inception in 1998, we are offering a limited number of full and partial scholarships based on need and merit, and aimed especially at those who aspire to eventually become teachers.

For more on how to register as a 2018 Shakuhachi Camp participant: https://shakucamp.com/registration

Lodging:
Participants are responsible for making their own lodging plans, by registering directly with Sunrise Ranch at the bottom of their page.

For additional Camp information and lodging: https://shakucamp.com/camp-info

This is more than just a memorable event, and I hope to see you there!

With love,

Cali Alexander, flute & shakuhachi

Hogaku Journal Article

「世界の尺八」は二十歳

デビッド勘輔ウィラー(琴古流尺八奏者・音楽学者)

今年、2つのイベント

ロンドン 国際尺八 フェスティバル

今年の夏に尺八界にとって二つの記念的イベントがあります。その一つは8月の「ワールド尺八フェスティバル(WSF)2018inロンドン」の開催です。1998年にアメリカ・コロラド州の「ボルダー国際尺八フェスティバル」はこういった海外フェスティバルの最初で、そこに世界各地より300人の参加者・出演者が集合し、1週間にわたって、大小20公演以上の演奏会で5000人の集客を得ました。奈良時代の東大寺大仏開眼供養以来、尺八史上最大のイベントとなったといえるかもしれません。以降、WSFは東京(02年)、ニューヨーク(04年)、シドニー(08年)、京都(12年)と平均4年に一度の開催が続き、今年のロンドンWSFでちょうど20年の節目を迎えます。

本曲を中心に海外の尺八愛好家人口はこの間ずっと増え続けています。オーストラリア尺八協会やヨーロッパ尺八協会、台湾尺八協会ができ、尺八指導で海外旅行をする日本人尺八奏者も増えています。中でも目立つのは京都の倉橋容堂さんと秩父の柿堺香さんです。彼らは1年のうち、2、3ヵ月海外(北南米、豪、欧、中国、台湾等)にいっています。

ロッキー マウンテン 尺八 サマー キャンプ

もう一つの記念的海外イベントは、あの最初のボルダーWSF1998で生まれた感動と熱意を将来に生かすべく創立された「ロッキーマウンテン尺八サマーキャンプ」の20回記念キャンプです。今年6月20日〜25日にボルダー市郊外のサンライズ・ランチで開催されます。講師陣は倉橋容堂、クリストファー遙盟、ライリー・リー、柿堺香、私と糸方の平岡洋子で、参加者の多くは北米からですが、日本人や中国人も来ています。35人前後の参加者(全くの初心者か師範格まで)はコロラドの田園的環境の中の高級合宿感覚で歴史、理論、技術等の講習会、グループレッスン、個人レッスンを受け、生徒発表に出演します。この「ロッキー尺八キャンプ」はコロラドのロッキー山脈東麓の施設を定例会場にしていますが、コロラド州だけで開催されているわけではありません。WSFとの縁を生かし、08年はシドニーで、12年は京都で提携開催しています。

このキャンプの一つの伝統に「Sunrise (no return) RO-buki(日の出「ロ」吹き)」があって、朝早く山に登って、地平線に向かって太陽が昇るまで筒音の「ロ」を吹きます。盆地の京都では東本願寺の境内でやらせていただきました。http://shakucamp.com

世界各地で続く尺八の進化

尺八の国際化が続きます。そもそも中国の楽器だった尺八が日本に伝わり、江戸時代に虚無僧の本曲と三曲合奏の分野が成立し、現在の古典尺八音楽となっています。それから20世紀に新日本音楽や現代邦楽も加わり少しインターナショナルな楽器になりました。

音楽は文化の一環で、文化だからこそ生きていて、その時代時代、場所場所で人々に影響され、進化し続けます。現代の情報化社会の中でその進化が世界各地で続いているし、内外でも互いに影響し合っています。今は、尺八の音の普遍的な魅力が外国でも広く楽しまれていて、新しい作品、新しい演奏形式等がどんどんできています。私が今住んでいるボルダーでも「Shakuhachi」は「Sushi」や「Tsunami」と同じように一般に通じる外来語になっています。

今、20年を記念するべきでしょうか?

最初の本当の国際尺八フェスティバルは1994年に故横山勝也師の国際尺八研修館が主催した「美星国際尺八音楽祭」で、そこからの四半世紀を記念したい気持ちが強いです。絶えることのない横山先生の熱意と努力がなければ20年前のボルダーそして今年のロンドン、ロッキー尺八キャンプは全てなかったに違いありません。

横山先生は1998ボルダーの前夜祭で泣きました。涙の演説の中で「こんな流儀を超えたフェスティバルは海外でなければできなかった」と言いました。横山先生をはじめ、尺八の国際化に大きく寄与した巨匠たち、演奏家、指導者、それから諸外国で尺八の新しい場、新しい世界を作り続ける尺八愛好家に感謝するべきでしょう。

今年の夏、コロラドやロンドンで会いましょう!

●ロッキーマウンテン尺八サマーキャンプ 参加費:$450(食事宿泊費別)初心者$250、奨学金あり、3月20日までの早割:$400

お問い合わせ:ShakuCamp@gmail.com

Advertisements

SU Blog Nomination

Greetings!

My name is Jeremy Reed and I am presently serving as the Chair of the Student Union of the Society for Ethnomusicology. I am writing to you, the student populous of SEM, on behalf of the Student Union to present a call for nominations (including self-nominations) for the position of Blog Editor.

The Student Union Blog (https://semstudentunion.wordpress.com/) is a fantastic forum for publishing student ideas and opinions in an easily accessible and year-round format. Beyond social media sites, the Student Union blog not only gives SEM members and ethnomusicologically-minded individuals a glimpse into Student Union activities, but also showcases ethnomusicology student ideas and conversations. Recent content series on the blog include: “Ethnomusicology and Parenthood”, “Snapshots from Fieldwork”, “In Discipline” [Ethnomusicology student-life around the globe]

We also plan on using the blog as a platform for a larger SEM Student Union project on fieldwork challenges and ethics.

This position is a great chance for those interested in editing/publishing. It also offers a fantastic opportunity for students to become involved in the Student Union and, by extension, the SEM at large. The responsibilities for the position are as follows:

Responsibilities of SU Blog Editor

·      Be proactive and self-directed

·      Recruit staff writers (on-going) and oversee deadlines

·      Work with writers to plan new series and contact potential contributors

·      Edit incoming posts

·      Organize blog schedule

·      Announce new blog posts on relevant social media pages

·      Delegate tasks to other blog members

o   Editing

o   Posting

o   Announcements

If you would like to nominate yourself or someone else, please submit the name, institutional affiliation, and email address of your nominee to studentunionnominations.sem@gmail.com
Thanks!

Jeremy Reed

PhD Student, Ethnomusicology
Chair, Society for Ethnomusicology Student Union

Indiana University – Bloomington

Thanks for everything!

This is my last post for this blog. Posting here has been an important source of hope for me. Being at times isolated from an ethnomusicological community in small towns in Spain where the discipline does not exist, writing for the blog made me feel connected. It pushed me to get in touch with colleagues here in Europe and to talk to them to propose them to collaborate with some of our projects. Although right now, as my period as collaborator of the SEM SU blog has finished, I am not sure whether or not the blog is the appropriate outlet to engage in conversation with, and to encourage dialogue among ethnomusicology students, I am definitely certain that writing for it does help feel the power of the discipline’s net. And I am not saying “net” meaning a trap where things get stuck to be fed to a giant spider, but as a safety net where we, ethnomusicology students and actual circus acrobats willingly walking through the abyss of future unstable employment, bounce into to get back walking the Ethnomusicology path. So, if you are a student and you do not find time to read the blog, or you find it to be an old fashion media, I encourage you to at least write for it, and get this wonderful net going.

  • Ana

Continue reading

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Greetings!

My name is Jeremy Reed and I am presently serving as the Chair of the Student Union of the Society for Ethnomusicology. I am writing to you, the student populous of SEM, on behalf of the Student Union to present a call for nominations (including self-nominations) for the Executive Committee positions of Vice-Chair and Treasurer/Secretary. These positions offer a fantastic opportunity for students to become involved in the Student Union and, by extension, the SEM at large. The responsibilities for each position are as follows:

Continue reading

Disciplinary Intervention for a Practice of Ethnomusicology

SEM’s “Disciplinary Intervention for a Practice of Ethnomusicology” statement was created by the SEM Council subcommittee and published on the SEM blog Sound Matters on May 5, 2017. The SEM Student Union Blog is proud to support the ideas and ideals of this statement. Blog editor Ana-María Alarcón-Jiménez has translated the document into Spanish, blog contributor Heidi Xiaorong Yuan has translated it into Chinese, and Nil Basdurak has completed a translation in Turkish. Please click the links below to find the original statement and the translations. Signatures are still welcome. The list of signers will be published in Sound Matters. We are anxious to include as many translations here in the blog as we can, so if you’d like to contribute with a translation, please send us an email (semsublog@gmail.com).

对于民族音乐学者实践的实施规范

Intervención disciplinaria para la práctica de la etnomusicología

Disciplinary Intervention for a Practice of Ethnomusicology

Disciplinary Intervention for a Practice of Ethnomusicology_Turkish_ Nil Basdurak

“Student Voices:” A Collaboration with the SEM Student News Bulletin

Introducción

(for the English version of this introduction go to Student News)

Para muchos de nosotros, el trabajo de campo es una de las partes más emocionantes del proceso de investigación etnomusicológico. Nos preparamos para el trabajo de campo por adelantado, encuadrándolo en propuestas de investigación, diseñando cuestionarios para diferentes tipos de entrevistas, aprendiendo idiomas, haciendo contactos preliminares, preparando viajes, y leyendo, escuchando y viendo material relevante. Sin embargo, estar en “el campo”, o “en el terreno”, como llamaremos a este espacio a lo largo de este post, casi siempre significa remodelar, reformular y adaptarse a las relaciones y circunstancias socio-musicales que encontramos, y de las cuales aprendemos poco a poco, en el día a día. ¿Cómo ha sido la experiencia de estudiantes de etnomusicología con este aspecto particular de la adaptación in situ y qué impacto ha tenido esto en su investigación?

Continue reading

The Ten Tracks Project: #2

The Ten Tracks Project

The Ten Tracks Project is an invitation to both listen and visualize ethnomusicology students’ research projects. Limited to ten sound and/or audiovisual files, Ten Tracks Project participants are challenged to create a playlist to introduce their listeners into a glimpse of the sounds, performers, audiences, dances, and/or performing spaces that they are writing, thinking, and learning about.

  • Playlist author: Ana María Alarcón Jiménez
  • Where do you study? Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal
  • Fieldwork Location: Galicia, Northwestern Spain
  • Research title: Spatializing Galician Music at the International Festival of the Celtic World.
  • Why are these ten tracks on your list?

Continue reading

Responding: Review of Ethnomusicology Pedagogy at the 61st SEM Annual Meeting

By Xiaorong Yuan (Heidi), Kent State University

As ethnomusicologists, we spend our professional time in the classroom or preparing to teach. However, what we teach, how we teach, and why we teach ethnomusicology to different levels of audiences and students has become an issue that needs to be discussed. In 2016, at the annual SEM meeting in Washington, D.C., several panels and papers had insightful discussions about pedagogy that ethnomusicologists use and address when they are teaching. This report selects three panels related to ethnomusicological pedagogy: the roundtable panel “Music Pedagogy for the 21st Century”, “Global to Local Music Outreach”, and “World Music Pedagogy Workshop”, which highlight the diverse possibility of teaching ethnomusicology in a variety of environments and methodologies.

Continue reading

Introducing: Responding

Hello dear readers, this is Liza. Today I’m introducing the first entry in a new series called Responding, a space where ethnomusicology graduate students react to papers or panels they attended at Society for Ethnomusicology annual conferences. I love the energy and excitement generated at SEM conferences, and I imagined this series as a way to continue the rich, generative conversations we have over a few short days throughout the rest of the year. Here is our first contribution, by Heather Strohschein.

I can’t believe six months have already passed since SEM 2016. I’ve been going to SEM conferences since . . . oh jeez . . . it’s been over ten years . . . (trying not to think about how old I am). I haven’t made it to every single conference since my very first in 2005, but every time I go, I’m reenergized by the plethora of ideas, the multitudinous approaches to research, and the multisyllabic words I need to look up at the end of the day.

This year, Liza suggested writing about a specific paper or papers that really stood out. This is a great way to keep the ideas and inspiration of SEM fresh in our minds as well as keeping a conversation going regarding these ideas. I saw and heard some fantastic papers this year, but the one that got me thinking the most was presented by Trevor Reed from Columbia University on the first day of the conference. His paper was titled “On the Generativity of Letting Culture Die.” No colon! I was immediately intrigued.

Continue reading

Response to In Discipline

A year and a half ago we published our last contribution for the projectIn Discipline: Talks from the European Side.” Since then, we have had the idea of generating a dialogue between professors and students, as a way to channel or to start to channel students’ ideas, needs, and preocupations in a horizontal and inter-generational kind of way.  The contribution below, written by the Catalan Anthropologist Josep Martí, is thus what we hope to be the first step of an ongoing conversation. Josep Martí’s text has been written in Catalan (top), and it has been translated into English (bottom),  continuing our effort to make this blog, and the In Discipline project,  multilingual.

Dr. Josep Martí is a Scientific Researcher at the Milà i Fontanals Institute (Barcelona), which makes up part of the Spanish National Research Council, otherwise known as “CSIC.” He has conducted fieldwork in different European countries, in Japan, and most recently in Equatorial Guinea. His research interests include, as reflected in his numerous publications,  the anthropology of the body, the anthropology of music, and popular culture.

Continue reading