Response to In Discipline

A year and a half ago we published our last contribution for the projectIn Discipline: Talks from the European Side.” Since then, we have had the idea of generating a dialogue between professors and students, as a way to channel or to start to channel students’ ideas, needs, and preocupations in a horizontal and inter-generational kind of way.  The contribution below, written by the Catalan Anthropologist Josep Martí, is thus what we hope to be the first step of an ongoing conversation. Josep Martí’s text has been written in Catalan (top), and it has been translated into English (bottom),  continuing our effort to make this blog, and the In Discipline project,  multilingual.

Dr. Josep Martí is a Scientific Researcher at the Milà i Fontanals Institute (Barcelona), which makes up part of the Spanish National Research Council, otherwise known as “CSIC.” He has conducted fieldwork in different European countries, in Japan, and most recently in Equatorial Guinea. His research interests include, as reflected in his numerous publications,  the anthropology of the body, the anthropology of music, and popular culture.

Continue reading

Advertisements

In Discipline

Since Ana first initiated In Discipline, we at the SU blog have had some wonderful interactions and connections with our fellow ethnomusicology students. One thing this series has taught me is that international connections are vast and important. While this series’ focus has been on students from Europe, this week’s contributor demonstrates how far these connections reach and the impact they can have on us as students. Cara Stacy is a PhD student in the South African College of Music at the University of Cape Town and SOAS, London. She got in contact with us through the British Forum for Ethnomusicology because, as she rightly noted, “it seems you don’t have any Africans who have contributed yet.” She discusses some similarities and differences between UK and South African institutions but mostly focuses on her experiences in South Africa. Thank you so much for your contribution, Cara!

 M Bhemani Continue reading

In Discipline: Talks from the European Side

For this week’s post Add Discipline, we are very happy to introduce Bernd Brabec de Mori, a post-doctoral graduate who works and teaches at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz, Austria. Bernd speaks very candidly about the situation for students and graduates in ethnomusicology Some of the German-speaking parts of Europe.

Bernd

Continue reading

In Discipline: Talks from the European Side

For this week’s In Discipline post, we are very pleased to introduce Iva Nenic. Iva is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Ethnomusicology of Faculty of Music in Belgrade. She writes very eloquently about the joys and challenges of ethnomusicology students in Serbia.

iva_800

Continue reading

In Discipline: Talks from the European Side

For this week’s In Discipline, we are very happy to introduce Gertrud Maria Huber. Gertrud recently graduated from the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna with her Ph.D in Ethnomusicology. Also a professional zither and harp player; Gertrude’s performance practice centers on Alpine music. We encourage you to visit her website for more on Gertrude and her music!

Gertrud Maria Huber 1

Continue reading

In Discipline: Talks from the European Side

Welcome to In Discipline: 2015, dear readers! This evening, I have the pleasure of introducing Mikaela Minga, a researcher at the Albanian Institute of Anthropology and Arts who also currently teaches courses at the Faculty of Music in Tirana. Her thoughts and reflections offer us valuable perspectives on the field in Albania; many thanks for your contribution, Mikaela!

~Liza

DSCN3645

Continue reading